Visit Prostatitis.org    
View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently Thu Nov 21, 2019 7:02 pm



Reply to topic  [ 8 posts ] 
 Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone 
Author Message

Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:24 pm
Posts: 3
Post Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
Hello forum,

I just want to share something which has greatly reduced the pain I was experiencing for around 2-3 years in the prostate area.

I had frequent pain (burning, aching) in the prostate region for 2-3 years. Had various tests and scans carried out but nothing seemed to shed light on the underlying cause of the pain. I had 2 small prostate calcifications around 2-3 mm, which I thought might be causing the pain.. I took 'Rowatinex' to try and 'dissolve' these stones. The last CT scan I had, the stones were not detectable (apparently). I'm still to see the scans. The previous scan I had done in Philippines I was allowed to take the scans away - I could see the 2 stones in this scan. I'm still not 100% sure if those stones are definitely gone.

So, I thought the stones *might* be causing the problem,.. It turns out, they might have been a red herring.. as apparently it is very normal for men to have a few small calcifications in their prostate, and these usually don't cause symptoms in most men. So I always questioned that theory.

2 months ago I was in Portugal, and there was a lot of nice bread available.. so I was eating a lot of just bread and butter each day for breakfast and lunch. At night, I was wriggling around in my bed in pain. I wondered, if maybe the bread was contributing to the pain.

So I researched the link between bread and possible inflammation, and it turns out gluten and gliadin in breads and wheat based products triggers the autoimmune reaction contributing to inflammation. I wondered if the gluten and gliadin as it passed down the intestine to the colon (which is adjacent to the prostate) could be carrying with it the antibodies being produced in the immune response and causing the pain in prostate region - heat, burning, pain, redness - inflammation. The intestine is quite thin, and its possible the antibodies and proteins could pass over to the prostate as they pass by that area. Also, gliadin actually causes leaky gut, which allows particles, digestive juices, antibodies, bacteria etc.. to pass through the gut, into the surrounding tissues and areas.In fact gliadin does exactly that, it signals the pores in the gut to open, causing leaky gut and inflammation. If you have a distended, bloated belly - this might be the cause. Also, force of gravity naturally points downwards, and as a result, stuff leaking through the gut would usually pass down towards the prostate region where it encounters a 'dead end', I wondered? Right at the area between the anus and scrotum - anything leaking through the body will stop there and accumulate ?

Long story short, I cut out all wheat based gluten containing food - bread, cakes, pasta, biscuits, puff pastry, pizza, beer etc... And the symptoms have greatly improved. I don't want to tempt fate by saying it appears to have resolved. So basically, I am on a 'gluten free' diet now. I detoxed on a lot of water, fruits and fresh fish etc...

Interestingly, while I have had this prostate pain over the years, I found that Apple Cider Vinegar (with The Mother, such as Braggs), helped alleviate my symptoms a bit. There are enzymes and probiotics in ACV which can help break down food (possibly also gluten, gliadin?). I wonder if the ACV was helping because it in some way it was helping neutralise the 'things' (proteins) causing the source of the prostate inflammation ? If so, that would make sense.

I learned that following a gluten / gliadin reaction and the associated damage, that it can take many months to heal the gut. In fact, the damage to the gut does not appear to fully resolve. It damages the villi in that it shortens them, amongst other things. This leads to poor absorption of nutrients, dehydration, and general lethargy and gradual weakness, making the immune system weaker etc.. So, I think it will take some time to heal fully.

However, I'm really happy with the initial results of cutting out gluten. The prostate pain would come and go every few days or so.. sometimes I would think it was gone, then it would come back. If it is/was being caused by a 'food allergy', then this makes perfect sense.. As soon as you eat the food causing the reaction you get the pain, but obviously there are times when you wouldn't always be eating the food type causing triggering the pain. There is also possibly the slight delay between eating the food and the reaction, which night be why its difficult to always spot a food allergy.

Well, I thought I'd share this information, as it definitely has made my pain reduce a lot. Though i still feel tingles I believe a result of continuing leaky gut damage, though this is getting better too I think..

Btw, its been about 6 weeks since I discovered this.. and the only times i had the pain return a bit, was when I was lazy with what i was eating i.e. drinking 1 beer, or eating a food which I wasnt sure if it had gluten (turns out it did i.e. black pudding).

Well, might be worth a try if nothing else is helping..

Best regards,
David


Last edited by dr909 on Fri Sep 28, 2018 4:59 am, edited 2 times in total.



Thu Sep 20, 2018 3:00 pm
Profile

Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:24 pm
Posts: 3
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
Just a few more thoughts I had on this...

Many people who have prostatitis complain about having to urinate frequently. Generally, the body will urinate more frequently when its trying to get rid of something thats causing it a problem in some way. You had your urine tested and no bacteria was found yet your urinating all the time and have sore prostate area, and possibly pain at the tip of your penis..

If it isn't bacteria that is causing you to urinate frequently.. then it is something else that is causing you to urinate frequently, and this is likely the source of your pain (something in your body and also the urine).. this is likely to be the food type you are allergic to, whether it be wheat, gluten, peanuts etc.. The allergen will likely end up in the urine in the bladder (as well as faeces) . Your body will try to flush it out there.. The prostate is also next door to the bladder, in fact controlling the flow at the bladder neck.. The allergen is likely irritating the prostate directly or possibly the products of inflammation reacting with the prostate causing it to spasm and tighten up a bit.. Your wanting to urinate but you have weak flow because the muscle is tightened and tense because it is irritated.. yet your body is simultaneously trying to flush the noxious substance out at the same time..

I think the 'pain at the tip of then penis' symptom many have might be 'referred pain' **, a further way for the body to signal to you there is a problem.. it directs the pain to somewhere it is hoping to get a response from you to deal with the pain. There is nothing wrong with the tip of the penis per se, but the pain is being channeled there, and again it reaches a dead end there.. the source of the pain is likely the prostate and surrounding area or a reaction somewhere else within the digestive tract.. where the food allergen is initially encountered as the food is digested.. I think the food allergy would end up in both urinary system and digestive, small and large intestine, the rectum - right next door to the prostate (burning in in anal region). The inflammation substance / trigger, is perhaps able to permeate across and through tissues.. it spreads, and for men a collection end point might be the prostate and anal region.. We don't feel it in the small intestine, and large intestine because these organs often shut down certain types of pain.. its only once the irritant passes to certain areas we begin to feel and notice it?

** on second thoughts, although I don't have the pain at tip of penis symptom.. perhaps the pain there is caused directly by something in the urine (allergen) irritating the urethra ?


Fri Sep 21, 2018 2:20 am
Profile

Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2018 2:24 pm
Posts: 3
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
Another thing I do is this - Drink alkaline water wherever possible. I'm checking the pH of mineral water and always choose an alkali one nowadays. I think that helps a bit too.


Sun Sep 23, 2018 6:46 am
Profile

Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2015 4:11 pm
Posts: 694
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
I have searched in the internet the ph of the water I always drink because it's not written in the bottle. It seems that it's not the most alkaline.Today I have bought one supposed to be more alkaline. I have noticed that the flavour is more neutral. Maybe things as normal as the water we drink can have a big impact on our condition. In fact, one urologist told me that the reason why antibiotics have poor penetration into the prostate is due to the ph. I don't know if that is related but ph seems involved somehow.

It's a good advice, thank you.


Sun Sep 23, 2018 1:57 pm
Profile

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2016 11:55 am
Posts: 429
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
pH has much to do with osmosis and reverse osmosis, two ways in which nutrients and other particles are transferred across membranes and between aqueous solutions. It also influences how the stomach/gut are able to regulate absorption and digestion. A neutral pH substance can decrease acidity or increase it depending on other factors and substances which are present. It's a bit too complex for us to comprehend without some studying. If antibiotics work by inhibiting growth of bacteria, it is likely by starving them of nutrients, which probably means the abx are changing pH levels...most likely a source of certain side effects.


Sun Sep 23, 2018 6:18 pm
Profile

Joined: Thu Dec 31, 2015 4:11 pm
Posts: 694
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
I don't remember if it was acid or alkaline (I think it was acid) but one urologist told me that the main reason why most of antibiotics don't have good penetration into the prostate is because it has a different ph. Then he prescribed me Bactrim (Septrin in Spain) saying that it has more penetration. I don't know how is that related to ph, but that antibiotic didn't do anything in my case except bad side effects such as tinnitus, tremblings, weakness, muscle pain... etc...

Searching about prostate and ph I have found this, that says that maybe saying that the human prostate fluid is acid is because of a prejudice based on researching on dogs! But it seems they don't research it deeply. I got confused:

Quote:
A basic assumption in all experiments on prostatic physiology, particularly those designed to study the diffusion of drugs into the prostate gland, is that the pH of human prostatic fluid is similar to that of the dog, that is pH 6.1 to 6.5. We believe that this assumption is incorrect. Our data indicate 1) the expressed prostatic secretion of most normal men is alkaline (mean pH 7.31), 2) with prostatic infection the pH of prostatic fluid increases markedly (mean pH 8.34) and, therefore, drugs shown to diffuse into the canine prostate may be ineffective in treating prostatitis in humans and 3) the increase in pH of the expressed prostatic secretion seen with infection is not simply owing to an increase in the relative concentration of alkaline seminal vesicular components. Biochemical markers of seminal vesicular activity (fructose and prostaglandins) showed no correlation with pH values of expressed prostatic secretion. Hence, it appears that the change in pH of the expressed secretion is owing to a real increase in pH of prostatic fluid. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. An appreciation of the profound variation in the prostatic fluid pH may be of importance not only in furthering the understanding and treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis but, also, of other prostatic diseases as well.

Maybe the urologist that told me that was under that assumption based on experiments with dogs (a mistake if you ask me). So we still don't know why antibiotics don't work inside the prostate like in other parts of our bodies?

Anyway, I think that drinking alkaline water may help with and infection or inflammation.


Sun Sep 23, 2018 8:26 pm
Profile

Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2012 7:08 pm
Posts: 23
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
There are a lot of people saying there is a link between gluten and prostatitis/cpps on the 'net. Just Google 'gluten and cpps' ...... you'll be amazed. I was quite surprised, had not thought of it before.


Sun Sep 23, 2018 11:14 pm
Profile

Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2016 11:55 am
Posts: 429
Post Re: Avoiding wheat, symptoms gone
The breakdown of carbohydrates does a number of things, which could explain pH changes. But it doesn't easily account for pH changes in the prostate. Prostaglandins is considered a protein/enzyme, so it could be a catalyst of pH increase. This is why gut absorption of proteins/enzymes is vital to maintaining a normal level of gut acidity/alkalinity.

I think that research study is assuming too much by concluding that the prostaglandins and other "seminal vesicular components" do not explain pH increase beyond normal ranges. The whole idea of pH balance is to keep it in a range that it's normally within, and normally fluctuates within. Perhaps an increase beyond 7.3 is necessary short-term and a further reaction or chemical process is the buffer that neutralizes back to normal. Like I said, the stuff is too complex to understand well enough in an academic way to do something about completely correctly.

Avoiding wheat may be a solution for some, but it's more of a risk due to not knowing how it would affect other aspects of health and whether it really is the cause of a resolution to CPPS/prostatitis problems. Not all wheat contains gluten, or a high amount of it either. Wheat is not a significant portion of my diet, not only because I don't eat much bread, but also because I only have one or two bowls of cereal at most per day. That is a low amount of wheat. People far in the past ate much more wheat, and I'm pretty sure gluten is a constituent of certain other grains too. Sugar, fat content, cholesterol, certain enzymes, and even vitamins have also gotten the inflammation warning attached to them.

By the time most of the digested food gets to the lower urinary tract, it is in a mostly dissolved form that, in realistic terms, is not capable of initiating large-scale, chronic inflammation all by itself. The loss of blood flow and too much activity is often capable of producing an inflammation reaction that's unordinary. Why are there topical creams and lotions to restore pH balance for skin? Ever look at the ingredients of ones you've used or popular ones? even the less common ones which aren't available in a basic store?


Mon Sep 24, 2018 10:16 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 8 posts ] 

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware for PTF.